Category Archives: Fan Art

Painting on Matboard

meglyman_anna1

meglyman_elsa1

Anna and Elsa by Meg Lyman

3.5 x 4.5 inches each

Gouache on matboard

One of the joys of being a gouache painter is the toned background. There are plenty of ways to get this effect in various media, but it’s fun and handy to paint right on whatever background you find. Some of the toned/colored supports I’ve used with gouache include matboard, Canson Mi-Teintes Board, Pastelbord, Colourfix board, Canson pastel paper, colored ACEOs, notecards, and various other colored papers. Some are more archival than others, some are rougher, some smoother; some are flimsy and some sturdy. Matboard is probably my favorite, for several reasons:

  1. It’s cheap – often art stores will have scrap bins and you can get pieces for $0.50
  2. You can get archival material if you want it (Canson Mi-Teintes Board is a good one, already cut to size)
  3. It has a nice texture – not too smooth or rough
  4. The surface can usually take a bit of abuse
  5. It’s sturdy – it won’t buckle and you can wave it around all crazy-like
  6. It comes in lots of pretty colors

Little left-over scraps are great for quick studies or plein air paintings. I also use them sometimes as backing when framing up ACEOs. In conclusion: matboard is great for gouache people!

Whew

meglyman_pikachu

Pikasquid by Meg Lyman

2.5″ square on illustration board

SOLD

Finally done with conventions for a while! Time to finish up my existing commissions and some of my personal projects. In the meantime, I’ll post some of the things I’ve finished in the last 6 months, including a few con doodles (like this guy). I probably shouldn’t have opened that can of worms (Pokemon), but it’s too late now.

AXE COP

meglyman_axecop

Axe Cop by Meg Lyman

6×12″ gouache and ink on illustration board

Etsy link

If you haven’t seen the show (or comic) Axe Cop, you’re missing out on one of life’s finest experiences. That is, if you’re a 30-something and grew up watching dumb cartoons.

The characters are: Sockarang, Wexter, Axe Cop, Baby Man, Unibaby, and Flute Cop. This is my first time putting a moustache on an octopus… feel free to judge me for that.

Ewoktopus

meglyman_ewok

Ewoktopus by Meg Lyman

Indeterminate but small size, gouache and ink on paper

SOLD

A fun commission from a convention last year! Sorry for the cell phone photo quality. I’m cleaning out some older art to post for y’all while I’m working on some larger projects, and a few long how-to posts. Lucky y’all.

Last few sale hours!

Just a reminder that there are a few hours left in the Black Friday/Cyber Monday sale in my Etsy shop! Use coupon code IAMAWESOME to save 15% on originals and calendars.

Etsy shop link

Also, I recently received some squee-worthy sculptures from Kara, who makes them herself with love and clay. Here is a gift she sent – an octopus hugging a beer bottle! Now it is my most favorite mascot and it helps me clean my tablet and reminds me to drink when I paint. I tend to forget.

drinky1

drinky2

If you’d like to purchase one of her excellent creations yourself, she has some available. Pepper her with ooohs and ahhs at princessridiculous at gmail if you’re so inclined. Thanks, Kara!

Blue on White

meglyman_stitch

Stitch by Meg Lyman

Postcard size, gouache and ink

SOLD

Any other gouache gurus out there have a tough time getting the lighter blues to play nice with white paper? They do fine for me on toned paper, and the darker blues (ultramarine, prussian) do fine on white paper. But the lighter blues (cerulean, cobalt, and turquoise somewhat) just don’t want to smooth out. They tend to look blotchy, and get looking kinda chalky when layered. I’ve tried several brands of each and it’s repeatable across brands. Anyone?

I feel fairly good about this one, but I got the effect after much fiddling. I ended up laying it down out of the tube, evenly over the entire blue area. Then I scrubbed most of it off with a paper towel… and repeated the process over and over again. The paper took a beating well, so I got lucky. I guess that’s the way a lot of paintings work, isn’t it?